Top-10 CV Writing Tips

Top-10 Tips to Create a Perfect Curriculum Vitae

Top-10 Interview Tips for Job Seekers

These ten tips will help you for a successful interview; from greetings to saying thank you.

How to Write A Successful CV

Click to see that how you can make your CV successful.

Most Common Interview Questions and their Best Answers

Click to read 15 most common job interview questions and their best suitable answers.

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Saturday, June 15, 2013

Most Common Interview Questions and Their Answers

Interview is a greatest opportunity for job applicants to prove that he is the best person for the job! Practice your responses so you sound positive, and clear, about your circumstances and your goals for the future. Be enthusiastic and confident when responding to questions. Don't rush your answers, but don't ramble on and on, either. Try to avoid using unnecessary words and repeating yourself or annoying phrases.


Most questions will relate either to your ability to do the job or to the type of employee you will be. Here are  15 most commonly used questions with their best and suitable answers:  

1. Tell me about yourself

The most often asked question in interviews. You need to have a short statement prepared in your mind. Be careful that it does not sound rehearsed. Limit it to work-related items unless instructed otherwise.
Talk about things you have done and jobs you have held that relate to the position you are interviewing for. Start with the item farthest back and work up to the present.

2. Say something about your previous organizations?

Stay positive regardless of the circumstances. Never refer to a major problem with management and never speak ill of supervisors, co-workers or the organization. If you do, you will be the one looking bad. Keep smiling and talk about leaving for a positive reason such as an opportunity, a chance to do something special or other forward-looking reasons.

3. What do you know about this organization?

This question is one reason to do some research on the organization before the interview. Find out where they have been and where they are going. What are the current issues and who are the major players?

4. Why do you want to work for this organization?

This may take some thought and certainly, should be based on the research you have done on the organization. Sincerity is extremely important here and will easily be sensed. Relate it to your long-term career goals.

5. What kind of salary do you need?

A loaded question.  A nasty little game that you will probably lose if you answer first. So, do not answer it. Instead, say something like, That’s a tough question. Can you tell me the range for this position?
In most cases, the interviewer, taken off guard, will tell you. If not, say that it can depend on the details of the job. Then give a wide range.

6. What will you do for this organization?

You should be anxious for this question. It gives you a chance to highlight your best points as they relate to the position being discussed. Give a little advance thought to this relationship.

7. Why should we hire you?

Point out how your assets meet what the organization needs. Do not mention any other candidates to make a comparison.

8. What is your greatest strength?

Numerous answers are good, just stay positive. A few good examples:
Your ability to prioritize, Your problem-solving skills, Your ability to work under pressure, Your ability to focus on projects, Your professional expertise, Your leadership skills, Your positive attitude....
There are numerous other good possibilities; Loyalty, Energy, Positive attitude, Leadership, Team player, Expertise, Initiative, Patience, Hard work, Creativity, Problem solver...

9. What is Your Greatest Weakness?

When you're asked what your greatest weakness is there are several different ways you can answer. Analyze the key skills and strengths required for the position you are interviewing for and then come up with an honest shortcoming which is not essential for success in that job. For example if you are applying for a technical job, you might share that you are not particularly adept at conducting group presentations.
I like to make sure that my work is perfect, so I tend to perhaps spend a little too much time checking it. However, I've come to a good balance by setting up a system to ensure everything is done correctly the first time.

10. Why Are You Leaving Your Job?

Regardless of why you left, don't speak badly about your previous employer. The interviewer may wonder if you will be bad-mouthing his company next time you're looking for work. You may answer positively i.e. 
  • I was commuting to the city and spending a significant amount of time each day on travel. I would prefer to be closer to home.
  • To be honest, I wasn't considering a move, but, I saw this job posting and was intrigued by the position and the company. It sounds like an exciting opportunity and an ideal match with my qualifications.
  • This position seemed like an excellent match for my skills and experience and I am not able to fully utilize them in my present job.
  • I recently received my degree and I want to utilize my educational background in my next position.

11. How Do You Work Under Stress / Pressure?

Examples of good responses include:
Stress is very important to me. With stress, I do the best possible job. The appropriate way to deal with stress is to make sure I have the correct balance between good stress and bad stress. I need good stress to stay motivated and productive.
I'm not a person who has a difficult time with stress. When I'm under pressure, I focus, and get the job done. I'm the kind of person who stays calm under pressure, and handles stress fairly easily.

12. What Are Your Goals for the Future?/ Where you see yourself after 10 years?

The best way to respond to this question is to refer to the position and the company you are interviewing with. You want to connect your answer to the job you are applying for instead of discussing your goals about your family or personal life.

13. What were your starting and final levels of compensation?

Be prepared to tell the interviewer how much you earned at each of your prior positions.
Make sure that what you tell the interviewer matches what you listed on your job application. Refresh your memory prior to the interview by reviewing your salary history, so, you can speak in detail and accurately. Don't exaggerate or inflate your earnings. Many employers will check references and confirm your salary history prior to making a job offer. A discrepancy between what you reported and what the employer says could knock you out of contention for the job.

14. What were your responsibilities in previous Organization?

The best way to respond is to describe your responsibilities in detail and to connect them to the job you are interviewing for. Try to tie your responsibilities in with those listed in the job description for the new position. That way, the employer will see that you have the qualifications necessary to do the job. Focus most on your responsibilities that are directly related to the new job's requirements.
It's also important to be honest. Don't embellish your job, because you don't know who the hiring manager will be checking with when they check your references.

15. Do you have any questions for me?

Always have some questions prepared. Questions prepared where you will be an asset to the organization are good. How soon will I be able to be productive? What type of projects will I be able to assist on?